The BIBLE VIEW #868 — Death for A Christian

Do your part to get Bible teachings to others. Share!
Share on Facebook
Facebook
Tweet about this on Twitter
Twitter
Pin on Pinterest
Pinterest
Email this to someone
email

In This Issue:
Looking Forward to Heaven
A Christian’s Philosophy of Heaven
Thoughts of Death
Heaven’s Roll Call
Going to “Bed”
How Does the Bible Tell One to be Saved from Hell?

Volume: 868     July 25, 2022
Theme:  Death for a Christian

Sign-up to receive the free DAILY VIEW e-mailed devotion at https://lp.constantcontactpages.com/su/a26cc9M.  It includes a KJV chapter, a short explanation of something in the day’s reading, and more spiritual food for the hungry soul!


Looking Forward to Heaven
Bill Brinkworth

No one will escape the one part of life that is scary to many: death (unless the rapture occurs first, and the person is saved!).  Because of the uncertainty, everyone wonders what happens when their body dies?

For the born-again child of God, there is hope and a promise for life after death (II Corinthians 5:2).  The Bible does not mention, as some cults teach, that when one dies, they breathe their last breath and their “life” is over.  Death will not be the end, however, because everyone has a soul that will live forever.  It will live forever in either Heaven or Hell.

Because of God’s promise about Heaven, many “groan, earnestly desiring to be clothed upon with our house which is from heaven:” (II Cor. 5:2).   The writer of that verse, Paul, was busy for the Lord while he was here on this Earth, and was expectantly awaiting his eternity in Glory.  So many Christians, while battling infirmities, hardships, and heartaches here, look forward to Heaven — a place of eternal joy.

One reason Paul looked forward to Heaven was one that today’s believers should also long for.  That reason is now we live by faith (II Cor. 5:7), but in Glory, the believer will live by sight.  We must trust God’s Word and not always physically see its promises are true.  One day, however, we will see all the glorious things God has promised come to pass.

With all the positive things to look forward to, Paul, and all Christians, should not be afraid of their eternal future.  When our body gives its last breath in this world, we may be “absent from the body,” but we will be instantly “present with the Lord” (II Cor. 5:8).  We have God’s Word on that!

For the child of God, death is the entranceway to Heaven.  For the one that has not trusted in Christ’s death as payment for their sins, it is the beginning of their real problems!


A Christian’s Philosophy of Heaven
Bill Brinkworth

Most people, Christians included, have much fear and anxiety about their death.  Paul had a much different outlook on his.  His attitude was that his life here on Earth was more important to others than to him (Philippians 1:24).  He considered death a gain rather than a great loss.
“For to me to live is Christ, and to die is gain.” Philippians 1:21

That is a different view than those living for the party scene.  They look forward to constant excitement and a busy life.  If they did not have ever-changing activities, they would not be happy.  The thought of death and the next life would not be something they would look forward to, as it would differ from what gratifies them.  They would fear an eternal future where they were not the center of attention.

One seeking political power and money is also satisfied when he is running things, and his voice is the one changing the way people live.  Those people would also not be content in Heaven, where God is the only ruling power, and His will is the only one that matters.

A Christian, however, should have a completely different view of his eternal future, as did Paul.  This life is not our permanent home; we’re just “pilgrims passing through.”  While we are alive, we have a purpose of being a good testimony for the cause of Christ and serving the Lord any way we can.

If we have done what the Bible says one must do to have God’s promise of Heaven by being saved, we no longer have to fear eternity.  We can have great peace that the world does not have concerning this matter (Psalm 119:165).  We may even find ourselves like Paul, longing to be with the Lord but content serving Him while we are here.
“For I am in a strait betwixt two, having a desire to depart, and to be with Christ; which is far better:” Philippians 1:23

This world is the land of the dying; the next, for the believer, is the land of the living.” Tryon


Thoughts of Death
C. H. Spurgeon

History tells us Peter Waldo of Lyons was sitting at a banquet as thoughtless and careless as any of the attendees when, suddenly, one at the table bowed his head and died.  Waldo was startled and went home to seek his God.  He searched the Scriptures and became a great helper of the Waldensian church, which in the Alpine valleys kept the lamp of the Gospel burning when all around was veiled in “night.” A whole church of God was thus strengthened and perpetuated by the influence of death upon a single mind.

Luther, in his younger days, while walking with his friend Alexis, saw him struck to the ground by a flash of lightning. His experience worked in his heart to urge him to study and examine the doctrine of justification by faith. This studying helped him to be the liberator of Europe from papal bondage.

How much we owe to this weighty subject! Among the earnest, prayerful, and holy, many admit that the thoughts of death have brought them spiritual health. Men have been helped to live by remembering that they must die: yea, some men knew nothing of the highest form of life till death aroused them from their deadly slumbers.


Heaven’s Roll Call
D. L. Moody

A wounded soldier lay dying on his cot. Suddenly, the death-like stillness of the room was broken by the cry, “Here! Here!” burst from the dying man’s lips.

Friends rushed to the spot and asked what he wanted. “Hark,” he said, “they are calling the roll in Heaven, and I am answering to my name.” In a few moments, he whispered, “Here!” and passed into the presence of the King.

“Death to the Christian is the funeral of all his sorrows and evils, and the resurrection of all his joys.”   — Aughey


Going to “Bed”
C. H. Spurgeon

The child has to go to bed but does not cry because its mother has gone upstairs with it. It is quite dark, but what of that? The mother’s eyes are lamps to the child. Is it very lonely and still? Not so; the mother’s arms are the child’s company, and her voice is its music.

Oh, Lord, when the hour comes for me to go to “bed,” I know thou wilt take me there and speak lovingly into my ear.  Therefore, I cannot fear but will, with faith and hope, even look forward to that hour of thy manifested love.

Each hour my pulses, like soft drums.
Beat my approach, dear Lord, to thee;
If quick or slow my marches be,
Ere long I shall sit down by Thee.  — Author Unknown


How Does the Bible Tell One to be Saved from Hell?

  1. Know that you are a sinner: “For all have sinned, and come short of the glory of God;” Romans 3:23  Also: Romans 5:12, I John 1:10.
  2. Hell is the payment for all that have sinned. “For the wages of sin is death; but the gift of God is eternal life through Jesus Christ our Lord.” Rom. 6:23
    “Wherefore, as by one man sin entered into the world, and death by sin; and so death passed upon all men, for that all have sinned:” Romans 5:12
  3. BUT, there is good news!  Jesus’ death on the cross is the payment for the sins of all that call upon Him for salvation! Just ask Him to save you!
    “That if thou shalt confess with thy mouth the Lord Jesus, and shalt believe in thine heart that God hath raised him from the dead, thou shalt be saved.” Romans 10:9
    “For whosoever shall call upon the name of the Lord shall be saved.” Rom. 10:13

“Our road has a hopeless end unless we follow an endless hope.”
— Author Unknown